6/13/2020: A Reading List

Bailey, Moya and Trudy. “On Misogynoir: Citation, Erasure, and Plagiarism.” Feminist Media Studies, vol. 18, no. 4, 2018, pp. 762-768.

Bailey, Moya and Whitney Peoples. “Towards a Black Feminist Health Science Studies.” Catalyst, vol. 3, no. 2, 2017, pp. 1-27.

Berry-McCrea, Erin L. “‘To My Girls in Therapy, See Imma Tell You This fo Free…’: Black Millennial Women Speaking Truth to Power in and Across the Digital Landscape.” Meridians: Feminism, Race, Transnationalism, vol. 16, no. 2, 2018, pp. 363-372.

Ford, Jillian. “Cultivating Citizenship as Feeling: A Conversation with Three Digital Alchemists.” Journal of Curriculum Theorizing, vol. 29, no. 2, 2013, pp. 220-229.

Garcia, Patricia, Cecilia Henriquez Fernández, and Ashley Jackson. “Counternarratives of Youth Participation Among Black Girls.” Youth & Society, 2019, pp. 1-22.

Garner, Porshé R., Dominique C. Hill, Jessica L. Robinson, and Durell M. Callier. “Uncovering Black Girlhood(s): Black Girl Pleasures as Anti-Respectability Methodology.” American Quarterly, vol. 71, no. 1, 2019, pp. 191-197.

Green, Kai M., Je Naé Taylor, Pascale Ifé Williams, and Christopher Roberts. “#BlackHealingMatters in the Time of #BlackLivesMatter.” Biography, vol. 41, no. 4, 2018, pp. 909-941.

Gumbs, Alexis Pauline. “Coal: Black Matter Oracle.” The Black Scholar, vol. 47, no. 3, 2017, pp. 3-7.

Gumbs, Alexis Pauline. “Repetition is Sacred: School of Our Lorde, Mobile Homecoming, and Legacy in Flight.Feminist Studies, vol. 40, no. 1, 2014, pp. 207-215.

Gumbs, Alexis Pauline. “Seven Possible Futures for the Black Feminist Artist.” Obsidian, vol. 42, nos. 1-2, 2016, pp. 114-120.

Hill, Dominique C. “Black Girl Pedagogies: Layered Lessons on Reliability.” Curriculum Inquiry, vol. 48, no. 3, 2018, pp. 383-405.

Judd, Bettina. “Sapphire as Praxis: Toward a Methodology of Anger.” Feminist Studies, vol. 45, no. 1, 2019, pp. 178-208.

Juhasz, Alexandra. “Yvonne Welbon Interviews Alexis Pauline Gumbs: Sisters in the Life.” Feminist Media Histories, vol. 5, no. 4, 2019, pp. 76-86.

Kynard, Carmen. Vernacular Insurrections: Race, Black Protest, and the New Century in Composition-Literacies Studies. SUNY Press, 2013.

Lindsey, Treva B. “Ain’t Nobody Got Time for That: Anti-Black Girl Violence in the Era of #SayHerName.” Urban Education, vol. 53, no. 2, 2018, pp. 162-175.

Love, Bettina L. “‘No there is nothing wrong with your eyes, my letterhead is indeed crooked’: An Introduction to the Study of Black and Brown Lesbian Educators.” Journal of Lesbian Studies, vol. 21, no. 4, 2017, pp. 371-374.

McArthur, Sherell A. and Monique Lane. “Schoolin’ Black Girls: Politicized Caring and Healing as Pedagogical Love.” The Urban Review, vol. 51, 2019, pp. 65-80.

McPherson, Kisha. “Black Girls are not Magic; They Are Human: Intersectionality and Inequity in the Greater Toronto Area (GTA) Schools.” Curriculum Inquiry, 2020.

Pritchard, Eric Darnell. “Black Girls Queer (Re)Dress: Fashion as Literacy Performance in Pariah.” QED: A Journal of GLBTQ Worldmaking, vol. 4, no. 3, 2017, pp. 127-155.

Richardson, Elaine. “Developing Critical Hip Hop Feminist Literacies: Centrality and Subversion of Sexuality in the Lives of Black Girls.” Equity & Excellence in Education, vol. 46, no. 3, 2013, pp. 327-341.

The Queer Diaspora Collective. “Fungibility in the Academia.” Higher Education for the Future, vol. 6, no. 2, 2019, pp. 158-170.

Wade, Ashleigh Greene. “Indigo Child Runnin’ Wild: Willow Smith’s Archive of Black Girl Magic.” National Political Science Review, 2018, pp. 21-33.

Wade, Ashleigh. “When Social Media Yields More than ‘Likes’: Black Girls’ Digital Kinship Formations.” Women, Gender, and Families of Color, vol. 7, no. 1, 2019, pp. 80-97.

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